Chlorophyll for Pets ©

Chlorophyll is a ‘super green’ natural plant component that is safely used by pets and humans.  It serves as a nutritional supplement and as a nutraceutical for healing and optimum immune function in dogs, cats, horses, livestock, fish, birds, rabbits and other small animals.

The benefits of chlorophyll are virtually the same for pets and humans:Chlorophyll for Pets

  • Digestive aid
  • Improved nutrient absorption
  • Anti-inflammatory
  • Anti-viral
  • Antioxidant
  • Anti-tumor
  • Binds carcinogens and may help prevent liver and colon cancer
  • Protects against toxin-induced kidney failure
  • Prebiotic
  • Lowers blood sugar
  • Lowers cholesterol
  • Lowers blood pressure
  • Aids immune system function
  • Cleanses and refurbishes red blood cells
  • May improve skin & coat
  • May help with weight loss

Sources of Chlorophyll for Pets

Seaweed – A full range of chlorophyll types can be obtained by simply mixing brown, red and green seaweed.  Since seaweed pigment is more complex than terrestrial plant pigmentation, each species has numerous forms of chlorophyll which in turn offers unique beneficial qualities.  Another advantage of seaweed over other supplements is the nutritional support that facilitates extended benefits. For example, horse trainers like the red blood cell improvement offered by chlorophyll, but to increase stamina through better oxygenation and electrolyte balance, the horse is better served by a whole, mixed seaweed supplement.

Spirulina sp. – This algae is packed with nutrients and chlorophyll but must be used in moderation.  It is toxic in large amounts and may be cyanogenic.  For this reason, we blend Spirulina with mixed powdered seaweed for a powerful supplement that is less likely to be overdosed, while also offering a broader range of nutrients and other benefits to the animal.

Chlorophyll Chlorella for PetsChlorella – Chlorella algae is tough to digest so it’s high Chlorophyll content is largely unavailable to pets.  However, there are supplements available that utilize a process involving cell wall cracking that makes the chlorophyll in Chlorella more available.

Terrestrial sources – Barley Grass, Wheat Grass and Alfalfa aren’t as packed with chlorophyll as the above foods, but they’re still great sources. Pets may enjoy nibbling on a tray of Wheat or Barley Grass if it’s provided for them.

Pet Chlorophyll Dosage

Chlorophyll may be part of your pet’s daily diet but very little is required due to the nutrient density and bio-availability. Below is a supplement/extract guideline (as opposed to a whole food source).

Cats – Add 1/8 tsp to each pound of food.

Dogs – Add 1/4 tsp to each pound of food.

Fish – Aquarium fish benefit from chlorophyll, usually obtained through seaweed and algae. It may also be used to ‘gut load’ (bio-encapsulate) live foods. In supplement form, a pinch for each pound of food is plenty. We use seaweed, algae and chlorophyll extract in our line of Bottom Bites natural fish food.

Birds – Whole food sources are usually recommended for birds.  Use extreme caution when administering chlorophyll in supplement form or from high level sources such as Spirulina or Chlorella. Nervous reactions may occur and some species are more sensitive than others.  Further research as it applies to your species is highly recommended.

Horses and other large animals – For larger animals you can do a human proportional estimate, but we suggest that you not exceed the human dosage no matter how large the animal.

Caution:  Large quantities of Chlorophyll may cause digestive issues in pets.

Natural Pet Care Blog CommentsDo you supplement your pet’s diet with chlorophyll?  Please share your experience in the comments below.

Sources:
Wynn, Susan G. DVM. Emerging Therapies: Using Herbs and Nutraceuticals for Small Animals. American Animal Hospital Assn. 1999.
Cooksley, Valerie Gennari. Seaweed: Nature’s Secret to Balancing Your Metabolism, Fighting Disease, and Revitalizing Body and Soul. 2007.
Messonnier, Shawn DVM. Natural Health Bible for Dogs & Cats: Your A-Z Guide to Over 200 Conditions, Herbs, Vitamins, and Supplements 2001.
Tilford, Gregory. Wulff, Mary. Herbs for Pets: The Natural Way to Enhance Your Pet’s LifeHerbs for Pets: The Natural Way to Enhance Your Pet's Life. 2009.
Balch, Phyllis. Prescription for Nutritional HealingPrescription for Nutritional Healing: A Practical A-to-Z Reference to Drug-Free Remedies Using Vitamins, Minerals, Herbs & Food Supplements. 2010.
Kellon, Eleanor M. V.M.D. Horse Journal Guide to Equine Supplements and Nutraceuticals. 2008.

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15 Responses to “Chlorophyll for Pets ©”

  1. 12birds says:

    I add chlorophyll to my dogs’ food twice per week and they get a bit of seaweed everyday on the advice of our vet.

  2. Loretta says:

    Thanks to you I’m trying seaweed so my dogs can get chlorophyll and the other goodies in it. Thanks for all you do for pets.

  3. Mini says:

    I’ve thought of adding some of my chlorophyl to our dogs food too but I never got around to googling it to see if it’s safe until now. Thanks for answering my questions.

  4. Chase Pflugh says:

    Thanks for sharing. I’ve been working with dogs most of my life, and it’s always nice to meet other dog lovers.

  5. Wendella says:

    You sold me on taking it myself too ROFL dam you’re good!!

  6. mewmew says:

    We use chlorophyll powder in a salt shaker (I got the idea from you) because it’s really easy to give pets too much.

  7. Tonya says:

    I found some chlorophyll tablets today and crushed them for my blue healer’s canned food. He ate it all up but I don’t know if he liked it or if he is just a pig and didn’t taste it but either way it’s in there. Thank you for the suggestions on this website.

  8. We eat a lot of seaweed in the coastal Maritimes and our health statistics prove how spectacular it is. Our dogs chew on fresh seaweed on the beach when we walk the shore and we do a lot of cooking with it. Chlorophyll is only a part of what seaweed can do for all living things.

  9. Danny says:

    My friend suggested chlorophyl for my dog when he was dying of cancer because he wouldn’t eat much. It did seem to give him a little boost and his eyes looked brighter like he was more alert. We had to let him go when it got painful but we kept him with us for as long as he was comfortable. Miss you still Lexie!!

  10. Tina says:

    great post ! it will really help pet owners.! Keep posting!

  11. Del Masters says:

    I just added a bit of seaweed to the dog & cat’s dinner and they didn’t even know it was there. ;-)

  12. Lucinda says:

    My dogs always share my green shakes and I add chloraphyll to them. :-)

  13. NoraLee says:

    There’s simply no end to the benefits of seaweed and you only have one of them here! We’ve been eating it for generations and they say it’s the secret to asian longevity. I should live to be 105! ;-)

  14. Rebecca says:

    I’m really getting into superfoods and chlorophyll is right up there on my list. I have been tempted to add it to my cat’s food sometimes so I really appreciate the info.

    • Melody McKinnon says:

      We’re big fans of nutritional healing and naturally sourced nutrition. I agree that chlorophyll is an exceptional example!

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